VR Science Lessons

Atoms in Solids

The first lesson shows that all matter consists of atoms. It will take students inside graphite and a diamond. Students will see that both materials consist of the same carbon atoms, but have very different properties because their atomic level structure is different. Students will also learn that atoms in solids do not stay still – they vibrate.

Atoms in Gases

You will zoom inside a helium balloon and see that helium gas consists of atoms that are flying. You will see that atoms in gas are further away from each other than in solids. Finally, you will see how atoms start flying faster if you increase the temperature.

Atom Structure

In this lesson, you will learn that an atom consists of a tiny atomic nucleus surrounded by an electron cloud. We will discuss the three main subatomic particles: protons, neutrons and electrons, and their properties.

Electron Orbitals

Electrons in an atom behave very differently. Students will see that when an electron becomes a part of an atom, it is spread around the nucleus like a cloud. They will also study the shapes of s- and p-orbitals. Later, students will cover the Pauli Exclusion Principle, which states that only two electrons can share the same orbital.

Isotopes

Students will learn that different carbon atoms always contain 6 protons but can contain different numbers of neutrons. These different atoms are called isotopes. This lesson will reinforce understanding of element symbol notation.

Orbital Names

Now that students know that electron behavior in atoms is described using orbitals, it is time to learn the orbitals’ names. Students will see electrons added to an atom one by one and learn the names of the orbitals.

Electron Configuration

An electron configuration diagram is a useful tool to represent electrons in atoms. In this lesson, we will introduce this diagram and see how it works when electrons are added to the nucleus one by one. Students will also learn Hund’s rule.

Atom Size

Students will see that electron orbitals look more like a fuzzy cloud of electron distribution without clear boundaries. So how is atom size defined? In this lesson, students will be introduced to several ways to define atom size.

Ions

Students will zoom inside a sodium chloride crystal and explore its “atoms.” They will see that the sodium atoms are missing one electron, while the chlorine atoms have one additional electron. In this way, students will explore the concept of ions.

Oxygen Atom

An interactive lab where students assemble their own oxygen atom given the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons.

Carbon Atom

An interactive lab where students assemble their own carbon atom given the number of protons and neutrons.

Carbon 14 Isotope

An interactive lab where students assemble their own carbon-14 isotope given the atomic mass and number of protons.

Sodium Atom

An interactive lab where students assemble their own sodium atom given the atomic mass and number of protons.

Nitrogen Atom

An interactive lab where students assemble their own nitrogen atom given only the number of electrons.

Neon Atom

An interactive lab where students assemble their own neon atom with the first two complete electron shells.

Make your Atom

An interactive lab where students can assemble any atom they want, and see what this element will look like.

Periodic Table

This is the first lesson where you will meet the periodic table. You will see how atoms are structured in the periodic table depending on their electron orbital configuration.

Periodic Table Box

You will learn that each box of the periodic table contains a lot of information about the element: name and symbol of the element, number of protons and electrons, atomic mass, and electron configuration.

Atomic Mass

You will fly into table salt crystal and find out that chlorine ions are not the same. There are two naturally abundant isotopes. You will find out that atomic mass is counted as average of masses of naturally abundant isotopes.

Atom Size Trends

The best way to understand atom size trends is by adding electrons, protons, and neutrons to an atom one by one to see how they affect atom size. You will learn why atom size gradually decreases from left to right across any given row in the periodic table, and increases again when you continue on to the next row.

Interactive Periodic Table

You can play with this interactive periodic table, exploring each atom and adjusting its electron orbitals and the corresponding configuration diagram.

Molecules

During a journey inside different materials (water, sugar, etc.) you will see that the atoms in them arranged in bigger groups called molecules.

Molecular Representation

We will show you different molecule representations. We will take one molecule and see several ways how we can show it.

Molecular Formula

In this interactive lab there are many different molecular compounds you can zoom into and see their molecules. You must write down their molecular formulas.

Make Methane Molecule

In this lab you will make a methane molecule out of atoms. You will also be able to switch between different molecule representations: a ball and stick, space filling, and structural.

Make Carbonic Acid Molecule

In this lab you will make carbonic acid. You will do this by combining carbon dioxide and water molecules. You will be able to switch between different molecule representations: ball and stick, space filling, and structural.

Make Dichloroethane Molecule

In this lab you will make dichloroethane by assembling ethylene and chlorine molecules first. You will be able to switch between different molecule representations: ball and stick, space filling, and structural and skeletal.

Make a Molecule

In this lab you can create any molecule out of atoms using the periodic table. When the molecule is assembled, you can switch between different molecule representations: ball and stick, space filling, and structural and skeletal (if applicable).

Avogadro’s Principle

In this laboratory, you will be introduced to Avogadro’s principle. In our virtual Gas Laboratory you will see that for different gases to maintain the same pressure in a fixed volume and at fixed temperature you will need the same number of molecules.

Avogadro's Principle
Boyle’s Law

In this laboratory, you will be introduced to Boyle’s Law. In our virtual Gas Laboratory you will carry out an experiment and make a graph of volume over pressure. You will see that at a constant temperature the volume of a fixed amount of gas is inversely proportional to the pressure.

Boyle’s Law
Charles’s Law

In this laboratory, you will be introduced to Charles’s Law. In our virtual Gas Laboratory, you will carry out an experiment and make a graph of volume over temperature. You will see that the volume of a fixed amount of gas is directly proportional to its temperature at a constant pressure.

Boyle’s Law
Dalton’s Law

In this laboratory, you will be introduced to Daltons’s Law. In our virtual Gas Laboratory you will carry out an experiment and explore the pressure of each component of a gas mixture. You will see that the total pressure exerted is equal to the sum of the partial pressures of the individual gases.

Boyle’s Law
Gay-Lussac’s Law

In this laboratory, you will be introduced to Gay-Lussac’s Law. In our virtual Gas Laboratory you will carry out an experiment and make a graph of pressure over temperature. You will see that gas pressure is directly proportional to temperature in Kelvin when the volume remains constant.

Boyle’s Law
Electric Charge

In this lesson, students will gain hands-on experience with the different types of charges and how they interact with each other. Students will then apply this knowledge in a pool-like game using charges instead of billiard balls!

Electric Force

In this interactive lab, you control the positions of two charged particles, recording the force. Use the obtained data to make a graph and see how the force depends on distance.

Boyle’s Law
Electric Field

To be supplied

Boyle’s Law
Dipole

Dipoles are introduced. You can see how a charge interacts with charges inside a dipole, and see individual forces for each particle, as well as the resulting force and the resulting position of the dipole. Students can set the positions of charges and dipoles, observe and record the forces. Data will be available to make graphs.

Boyle’s Law
Electric sandbox (Lab.)

In this interactive lab, you can play with charged particles, changing their positions and charges, and see how the forces change.

Boyle’s Law
Heating of Gas and Solid

To be supplied

Boyle’s Law
Temperature as Kinetic Energy

To be supplied

Boyle’s Law
Thermal Conductivity

To be supplied

Boyle’s Law
Speed Distribution vs. Temperature

In this interactive lab, you zoom inside a gas of a given temperature and measure and record the speed of different molecules. Later you can analyze your records to draw up a speed distribution chart.

Boyle’s Law
Speed Distribution vs. Molecular Mass

To be supplied

Boyle’s Law
LAB Thermal Conductivity

You will see a metal rod being heated from one side and zoom in to see the atomic structure at the hot side. You see how atoms vibrate faster and faster when the temperature increases, and see how they eventually transfer the vibration to the cold side.

Boyle’s Law
Tin Dendrite

This VR lesson will explain what happens in your Tin Dendrite experiment on the atomic level.

Fire Foam

To be supplied

Boyle’s Law

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